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“…most exciting new thing in haemodynamics in over a decade”

Interviewed about Deltex’s new TrueVue system, Chief Exec Ewan Phillips talks about the product’s background. Specifically, he explains how the company is “changing the story” by adding best-in-class technologies to its high end oesophageal Doppler monitoring platform.

Ewan tells us “Deltex has always been a single technology company, selling a solution that is best described as imaging meets monitoring.”

There’s no doubting the evidence behind oesophageal Doppler monitoring, which has the potential to “halve the number of post-operative complications, once and for all.”

Barriers to its adoption however have always been that it requires learning and hard work to get the best from it. Also, it can only be used in certain patients, primarily those who are either asleep or sedated. Ewan says “so now we’ve added Impedance Cardiography, which is the best continuous monitoring solution for the awake patient. In combination with oesophageal Doppler and arterial pressure line inputs we now have all three major monitoring technologies in one place.”

The new system sees the more heavily featured ODM+ rebranded as TrueVue. It’s extended range of application means it now fits the bill across hospital monitoring requirements. The system’s clinical user base will broaden to encompass anaesthetists, ICD practitioners, emergency room assessment and even obstetrics.

“That’s the beauty of it, commercially,” says Ewan, “and for practitioners who are nervous about intervention from the start of treatment, they can now monitor without intervention until they’re sure the patient needs it. They have a system that monitors the essential parameters of pressure, flow and resistance, and can spot whether the patient’s condition is drifting from a good place to less good place.”

Deltex Medical launched TrueVue at last weekend’s American Society of Anaesthesiologists(ASA) meeting in Boston. ASA is the biggest meeting of its type and sees US and international academics and practitioners congregating to discuss the very latest in treatment and technology.

On that front, Ewan enthuses “we’re now also able to combine pressure and flow monitoring simultaneously, which I think is the most exciting new thing in haemodynamics in over a decade!”